Some Days Never Come

In his book And the Angels Were Silent, Max Lucado talks about the women who anointed Jesus at the home of Simon – an act that takes place not long before Jesus’ death, calling her act one of “risky love.”

The disciples mock the extravagance of pouring so much expensive perfume over Jesus’ head.  “Why waste that perfume?  It could have been sold for a great deal of money and given to the poor.”

Jesus, however, defends the woman for her act; his message, Lucado suggests, is “as powerful today as it was then.”  The message being: “There is a time for risky love.  There is a time for extravagant gestures.  There is a time to pour out your affections on the one you love.  And when the time comes – seize it, don’t miss it.”

Lucado goes on to give examples that suggest how easy it is to miss it.  The boy who doesn’t defend his younger brother who is being bullied.  The husband who gets his wife a practical gift instead of something she will love, thinking, I’ll buy the other someday.

But there is a problem with someday:

Someday.  The enemy of risky love is a snake whose tongue has mastered the talk of deception.  “Someday,” he hisses.

“Someday, I can take her on the cruise.”

“Someday, I will have time to call and chat.”

“Someday, the children will understand why I was so busy.”

But you know the truth, don’t you?  You now even before I write it.  You could say it better than I.

Some days never come.

And the price of practicality is sometimes higher than extravagance.

The rewards of risky love, however, are always greater than its cost.

What are you putting off?  What opportunity for risky love are you missing?

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