Visions of Mary

Today is the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima, a day that commemorates the appearance of Mary to three Portuguese shepherd children on this date in 1917.

Nearly 80,000 visions of Mary have been claimed since the first in about 395, about 2200 of which have received official recognition by the Catholic Church. Apparitions have been reported in every continent on the planet, by people from all walks of life and of every age, and in places ranging from cities and churches to homes, caves, and fields.

This subject of Marian apparitions is one to which many people in our modern world react with some level of embarrassment or, at least, a deep skepticism. We live in a rational world that relies on what can be demonstrated scientifically, where things like apparitions seem to fall into the category of close encounters of the bizarre kind.

But the truth is the God continually reaches out to each of us, sometimes dramatically and sometimes in simple ways. Our God is a self-communicating God who continually speaks to us.

Is it so strange or impossible to imagine that one of the vehicles God might use to communicate with us is a vision of Mary, whom he chose to be the mother of Christ? So perhaps, rather than suspicion, our stance should be one of openness to the breadth of ways God might speak to us, including the possibility of God speaking to us through Mary.

Whether you believe in apparitions or not,, the day encourages us to be open to God’s continuous desire to communicate with us.

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One thought on “Visions of Mary

  1. Francis has greenlighted priests leading pilgrimages to Medjugorje without pronouncing on the “veracity” of the “apparitions.”

    An interesting story with some of his comments appears on the website of the Brooklyn TABLET.

    Some funny lines about his doubts that Mary appears on call and at specific times and places…

    He does affirm the holiness of the pilgrims and the great devotion to the Sacrament of Reconciliation, with long lines and confessions heard in seven languages…

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